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2016 Summit Presenters

Panelists (from left) Daniel Corral, Alade McKen, José Ángel Navejas, and Jaelyn Peiso

2016 Annual Summit

Undergraduate and Faculty Fellows Program for a Diverse Professoriate

August 18-19, 2016 in Chicago, IL

Co-sponsored by the ACM, the Big Ten Academic Alliance, and the University of Chicago


Noor Ali

Noor Ali

Noor Ali

Noor Ali, M.S.W., is the Assistant Director for Social Justice Education at Northwestern University and Adjunct Faculty at Harper College in Student Development. As Assistant Director for Social Justice Education, Ali oversees the Peer Inclusion Educators program (PIE), a peer-to-peer social justice program for students. She also co-manages the Step Up- Bystander Intervention Program, as well as serving as a liaison to many departments and organizations on campus as a social justice facilitator and mentor. Ali is also a self-proclaimed researcher and is especially interested in Arab-Jewish dialogue and its impact on student experiences. She has published four articles and has done a number of national presentations on the topic. Ali holds a B.S. in Psychology from Loyola University in Chicago and a M.S.W. from the University of Michigan School of Social Work.

Brian A. Burt

Brian A. Burt

Brian A. Burt

Brian A. Burt, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor of Higher Education in the School of Education at Iowa State University, and a National Academy of Education/Spencer Postdoctoral Fellow. Burt earned a B.S. in secondary English education from Indiana University and pursued a M.A. in Educational Policy and Leadership Studies from the University of Maryland-College Park. After completing his master’s degree, Burt remained at the University of Maryland as the Coordinator for Scholarships and Special Programs in the Undergraduate Studies office at the Robert H. Smith School of Business. In this position, he helped with the design, admissions, and execution of co-curricular merit programs. Burt later attended the University of Michigan to pursue a Ph.D. in Higher Education, and also became involved in national service by joining the Association of the Study of Higher Education's (ASHE) Board of Directors as the Graduate Student Representative. Currently, he is engaged in studying graduate student achievement, and the institutional policies and practices that influence students’ educational and workforce pathways.

Lisa B. Y. Calvente

Lisa B.Y. Calvente

Lisa B.Y. Calvente

Lisa B. Y. Calvente, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor of Intercultural Communication at DePaul University. She received her Ph.D. and M.A. in Communication Studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and her B.A. in Philosophy and Sociology at the City University of New York - Brooklyn College. Her primary areas of research are the Black Diaspora, Performance Studies and Cultural Studies. Calvente’s interests lie in the critical interrogation of anti-black and brown racism in the United States in order to generate possibilities of belonging and social justice. She has won a number of awards including the African American Studies Post-Doctoral Fellowship at Northwestern University, the DePaul University ENGAGE Award for outstanding teaching and mentorship for social justice, and the Woodrow Wilson 2015 Career Enhancement Fellowship for Junior Faculty. She is co-editor of Imprints of Revolution: Visual Representations of Resistance (Roman & Littlefield International 2016) and has contributed to anthologies and journals in her field.

Daniel Corral

Daniel Corral is a second-year doctoral student in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis and a Project Assistant at the Center for Academic Excellence in the College of Letters and Science at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Corral graduated Magna Cum Laude from Beloit College with a B.A. in Secondary Education and History. As a McNair Scholar, he conducted research on the academic performance, co-curricular involvement, and experiences of student-athletes in a NCAA Division III environment. As a summer research intern with Dr. Marybeth Gasman, Corral worked on a mixed methods research project that focused on initiatives and programs at Hispanic Serving Institutions (HSIs). Corral is interested in researching the intersection of race and gender as they relate to academic achievement. Specifically, he is interested in exploring how to provide Latino male students access to higher education.

Miguel de Baca

Miguel de Baca

Miguel de Baca

Miguel de Baca, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor of Art History at Lake Forest College.He received his Ph.D. in the History of American Civilization from Harvard University and his B.A. in American Studies from Stanford University. His research has been supported by fellowships from the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation, Dumbarton Oaks, the Charles Warren Center for Studies in American History, and the Smithsonian American Art Museum. He specializes in modern and contemporary American art history, and his work explores how memory is evoked through objects, architecture, and emerging media. He is the author of Memory Work: Anne Truitt and Sculpture (2015), and is presently at work on a manuscript about video art and protest.

Stephanie Hicks

Stephanie Hicks, M.Ed., is a doctoral candidate in the Educational Policy Studies – Social Foundations program at the College of Education, University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC), and earned her B.A. in English from Lake Forest College. Hicks has been a Graduate Assistant with the UIC Dialogue Initiative since 2011, and has worked with Campus Advocacy Network (WLRC) since 2015. While working with the Initiative, Hicks has had the opportunity to develop and lead dialogues around race, class, gender, sexuality and many other identities in the classroom and in co-curricular settings. Working with the great people at WLRC/CAN has given her the opportunity to engage in dialogue with students and staff that moves UIC towards creating a safer community, one that supports survivors of interpersonal violence and gives bystanders tools to take action. When she’s not working or studying, Hicks enjoys making yummy recipes even tastier, spending time with friends and family, and teaching yoga.

Lilly Lavner

Lilly Lavner

Lilly Lavner

Lilly Lavner, M.A., M.S., is the Liaison for the Fellows Program to Diversify the Professoriate for the Associated Colleges of the Midwest (ACM). Lavner earned a B.S. from Haverford College in Biology, as well as a M.A. in Higher Education and M.S. in Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology from the University of Michigan. While in graduate school, Lavner interned with IGR CommonGround (a co-curricular social justice education group). Prior to joining the ACM, Lavner held a position as Director of Student Activities and Leadership at her alma mater in the Dean’s Office at Haverford College. In her current role, Lavner works closely with colleagues at all 14 ACM colleges and the Big Ten Academic Alliance to further the goals of the Graduate School Exploration Fellowship (GSEF) program. Lavner also helps to plan and execute hiring and diversity workshops that explore complex barriers to diversity that exist in the hiring process (such as unconscious bias) and that help colleges better understand and take steps to intentionally build inclusive practices and environments for faculty, staff, and students.

Alade S. McKen

Alade S. McKen, M.S. Ed., is a second-year doctoral student and graduate assistant in the School of Education at Iowa State University. McKen received his B.A. in English and Creative Writing from Binghamton University, and his M.S. Ed. In Higher Education Administration from Baruch College, School of Public Affairs. McKen has worked in higher education for over 10 years. He examines the social foundations of education and culture within society, and is interested in researching diverse issues faced by African American students in higher education.

José Ángel Navejas

Jaelyn Peiso

Jaelyn Peiso is a rising second year doctoral student in the Impression Formation Social Neuroscience Laboratory at the University of Chicago. Peiso received her B.A. in Psychology from the University of South Florida and continued her post undergraduate research experience in the labs of Dr. Thomas Sanocki and Dr. Jamie Goldenberg. Peiso studies internalized oppression (stereotype threat), stereotypes, and individuation from a visual science, social psychology, neuroscience perspective. Her primary goal is to reduce prejudice and discrimination through the exploration of the underlying mechanisms and possible interventions for inflexible cognition.\

Hannah Schell

Hannah Schell

Hannah Schell

Hannah Schell, Ph.D., is a Professor of Philosophy and Religious Studies at Monmouth College. Schell received her Ph.D. in Religion from Princeton University and her B.A. in Philosophy with a minor in Asian Studies from Oberlin College. She teaches a wide array of courses, including historical approaches to the Bible, world religions, American religious history, women and religion, and theories and methods of the academic study of religion. Drawing upon her background in philosophy, Schell also regularly teaches ethics and the philosophy of religion, and has taught advanced seminars in American philosophy, 19th Century thought and Existentialism.


This program is funded in part by the Undergraduate and Faculty Fellows Program for a Diverse Professoriate, a generous grant received from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.